?

Log in

Ginger Snap [userpic]
A Few Things I Know About Writing
by Ginger Snap (earthwhatwere)
at August 21st, 2006 (03:55 pm)
contemplative

current location: Big Damn Writers
current mood: contemplative
Soundtrack: Van Morrison: Stranded

1) If you take a break from a writing project it will take twice as much effort to come back to it than if you worked on it daily until it is complete.

2) No matter how hard you try to limit the number of characters you introduce into an original work, they multiple like bunnies. Bunnies. I swear the characters are off shagging somewhere and multiplying.

3) Midway through the project you will begin to doubt every word of the story--did I begin in the right place, is the pacing too slow, do I take too long to introduce key characters, is this shite?

4) You will begin to hate a 60,000 word story somewhere around 32,000 words. Will it ever end?

5) The more focused and determined you are to write a scene, the more ways you can find to waste time before actually sitting down and writing the words. Oh, wait, need to check my eBay auctions, see if anything is selling.

Comments

Posted by: Love Doris (stormkpr)
Posted at: August 21st, 2006 08:27 pm (UTC)
FF ladies by ancarett

Makes sense. Except regarding #1, sometimes a brief break is required for me, to get me refreshed. But too long of a break can indeed be deadly.

Posted by: Nikki (nakeisha)
Posted at: August 25th, 2006 08:22 am (UTC)
Wilde: Writing

Here via metafandom

If you take a break from a writing project it will take twice as much effort to come back to it than if you worked on it daily until it is complete.

Hmmm, I beg to differ. At least as far as my own writing is concerned. I've been writing fanfic for over six years now, and wrote a lot of academic and work related stuff too, and I can safely say that for me, this is not the case, at all. I've left something for over a year, came back to it, sat down and finished it in a couple of days. And I'm the kind of writer who is always working on more than one thing at a time anyway, so I've had to get used, over the years, to be able to leave one project and come back to it days, weeks, months, years later and pick up as if I'd left off only the day before.

I think there is a lot of truth in all of your statements, and indeed they fit for many people, but equally they won't fit for many people too. Everyone differs in their writing, how they go about it, what works, what doesn't etc. etc.

Certainly, I have ended up hating my story at various points, and wonder if I began it in the right place, but again where this happens differs from project to project, and it doesn't always happen.

Posted by: J. William Pom Thomas C. Pom (poisonavery)
Posted at: August 25th, 2006 08:23 am (UTC)
[MLB] mapping it out like a master plan

aha, omg. I felt like you must be stalkin' me somehow when I read number 5. xD

However, I know you're not and it's good to know this is something universal.

Posted by: Ginger Snap (earthwhatwere)
Posted at: August 25th, 2006 03:38 pm (UTC)

For me, these are things I've learned about my own writing. They won't apply across the board for all writers. I know that if I stop writing on something I'll lose my focus and drive for that project. I can work on other things and finish them, but it's nothing but stalling. The longer I'm away from the project, the quieter the voices of the characters become.

I've had a number of stories that were so clear to me that I never doubted them. Those stories wrote themselves. I've had other stories that it felt as though I had to fight for every word. I wish I knew why writing is like that sometimes.

And finally, the harder a scene is, whether it be in finding the words or that the content of the scene is something I'm uncomfortable or afraid to deal with, the more I'll stall in writing it. I can have it perfectly outlined and I'll still dance around it.

Posted by: TamerTerra (tamerterra)
Posted at: August 26th, 2006 09:06 pm (UTC)

And finally, the harder a scene is, whether it be in finding the words or that the content of the scene is something I'm uncomfortable or afraid to deal with, the more I'll stall in writing it. I can have it perfectly outlined and I'll still dance around it.

The way I handle that is to open a new document and struggle through 500 words of a scene-type that I find even more difficult. Coming back to the fic after that makes it seem so much easier. ^_^

Posted by: Ginger Snap (earthwhatwere)
Posted at: August 28th, 2006 03:41 am (UTC)

If I just start writing, the words come easier. It's getting started, no matter how rough it is, that befuddles me. ;)

Posted by: kilraaj (kilraaj)
Posted at: August 25th, 2006 04:17 pm (UTC)
plagiarism

#1, 3, and 5 are so true for me. I've been writing on and off for a fanfic that's currently over 100,000 words, and I've just been having a horrendous time with the current chapter. (I'm about the 2/3 point. I think. This is what I get for not outlining.) I'm hoping that once this chapter is done, all the rest will come together smoothly (or at least, more smoothly than it is now).

And it's extraordinary how many ways you can find to waste time.

7 Read Comments